Nature Journaling Podcast!

I’m usually the one asking the questions but this time I’m in the hot seat. Recently, I was interviewed for the Journaling with Nature Podcast. Check it out and consider subscribing because it’s the only nature journaling podcast out there.

Here is the text from the Journaling With Nature Website:

Marley Peifer is a nature journal educator and mentor who is also the creator of The Nature Journal show, a weekly YouTube show specifically about nature journaling. In his videos Marley takes us along with him on his adventures, nature journaling outdoors, or in extreme places. He also shares information on his process, techniques, gear and favourite art tools, as well as interviews with other nature journalers. Marley has a lot of experience mentoring others on how to create a good mindset, how to start and keep going, stay motivated, bust barriers and journal more!

Listen to hear more about:

  • Marley’s childhood experiences in nature.

  • Fearless Friday and how Marley is working to combat the trap of creating ‘pretty pictures’.

  • Growth mindset vs fixed mindset and how this relates to nature journaling.

  • The importance of appropriate feedback around effort, for reinforcing a growth mindset.

  • Marley’s adventures creating The Nature Journal Show.

  • Nature journaling generalists vs specialists.

  • Marley’s vocabulary of ‘Bread and butter’, ‘Juice’ and ‘Growth Edge’ and what these terms mean.

Find out more about Marley and on his website marleypeifer.com, as well as on Facebook and Instagram.

Marley has a new distance learning program called The Nature Journal Family, which is a month-long nature journaling adventure aimed to deepen your connection with nature and community. You can find out all the details here.

Marley’s video on the Nature Journaling Mindset can be found here.

If you enjoy Marley’s work, you can support him on Patreon.

Thanks for listening!

www.journalingwithnature.com

How to Nature Journal Where You Grew Up

What was your connection to nature where you grew up? In this video, I show you how to nature journal where you grew up as I explore the natural area I first explored and fell in love with as a kid. Come on this adventure with me. See where I went as a kid. We’ll nature journal Southern California plants and nature mysteries. In addition we will  learn some techniques for reconnecting to a place.

Nature journaling is a powerful tool for science and for art. However, many people forget that journaling is probably the most powerful tool for connecting with feelings. Despite the direction science has gone in we cannot truly separate emotions from our connection with and understanding of nature. In fact, we can improve our nature journal pages by including more of these feelings. Not only that but when you get the feelings out of your head you can observe more of the world around you and perform better as an artist.

How to Nature Journal Where You Grew Up

  • First, be prepared. You can expect some strong feelings to come up when you visit your childhood nature. Many people will experience grief because their favorite tree from childhood is cut down. You might have lots of anger come up because the whole natural area has been developed. Be prepared for some emotions to come up. Try to be well resourced before you go. Did you get enough sleep? Do you have other major emotional drains in your life right now? If you are stressed in other ways it may make you more sensitive and reactive to what comes up for you.
  • Second, journal what is. For most people things have changed since they were a kid. This might make you avoid going back there. “I can’t nature journal there because it has all been developed.” “I can’t nature journal there because it is private property now.” The solution is to nature journal what is. Don’t ignore the human impacts. That is part of the place now, that is essential to the story. At the very least you could write a title, draw a simple map, and write down a few of your feelings. You will feel better by doing this and you will show respect for a place that helped shape you.
  • Third, use nature journaling to experience the place more like a kid. Your nature journal can help you see the place as you did when you were growing up. The nature journal process can help you slow down and remove the jaded perspective of an adult. This will help you connect to the place more instead of just walking around with your normal adult mind-wandering and ruminating. The default mode network is the part of your brain that will prevent you from connecting to this place.

 

How to Nature Journal Bugs!

We learn how to nature journal bugs and why they matter in this exciting conversation with the Beetle Lady! Why are kids fascinated with bugs? What about bugs grosses some people out? If we only like plants and birds then why should we nature journal bugs? Be prepared for the answers to these questions as well as more fun questions in this episode of the Nature Journal Show.

Stephanie Dole is a PhD entomologist, educator, artist, and mother in the Silicon Valley area. She teaches super fun hands-on bug classes for kids of all ages through her company and alias “Beetle Lady.” I’ve had the fortune of seeing some of her collection, including many pet insects and other invertebrates such as tarantulas. I have also been able to nature journal insects at her house and take her How to Draw Insects class. Check out her awesome reviews and offerings at her website.

Why Nature Journal Bugs?

  • Incomparable beauty. First of all, they are mindbogglingly beautiful. Where else in nature can you see the bright colors, intricate patterns, and fascinating forms of insects?
  • Diversity and Adaptations. Bugs display more diversity than almost any other type of life in addition to their beauty. Not only that, bu they also have some of the most fascinating and extreme behaviors and adaptations! Bugs do weirder stuff than any aliens in science fiction.
  • They are accessible and ubiquitous. Insects and other invertebrates can be found almost anywhere!  Mammals, reptiles, and even birds are not that easy to find or look at. This reason by itself would be enough to make them an important subject for nature journaling.
  • They are essential to ecosystems. Bugs provide so many services that humans could not survive without them. They are also a food source for many animals that people think are more cute. For example: no bugs=no birds.

3 Pro Tips: How to Nature Journal Bugs

  1. Learn to find them. First of all, you should improve your ability to find cool bugs in the wild. Practice looking under things, noticing damaged leaves, noticing other signs of invertebrates.
  2. Connect the dots. Pay attention to the relationships that your favorite plants and animals have to bugs. What more can you learn about the birds and plants this way? Even if you “dislike bugs” this could be eye opening.
  3. Get a pet. Bugs actually make great pets. They are good for kids and adults. They can provide a source of endless nature journaling inspiration. To see more about nature journaling pet insect check out this fun episode  with tips on how to nature journal your pet!

The Nature Journal Show in 2020…

It was a weird year but the Nature Journal Show persevered! In 2020 I made over 60 episodes packed full of humor, tips, interviews, and motivation. Making these episodes for the nature journaling community was a life saver for me this year.

If you want the summary before you watch the video than here you go…

15 Reasons the Nature Journal Show is Great!

  1. Humor. Funny is fun and it helps you learn better.
  2. Practical tips. Very practical in-depth tips on more aspects of nature journaling than you even knew existed.
  3. Science-based facts. Did you know that nature journaling burns calories?  Now you do.
  4. Ideas for everyone. Whether you are a home school family in Montana or you live in an apartment, the nature journal show has ideas for you!
  5. Self-awareness. An essential life skill discussed in almost every episode.
  6. Cool wildlife sightings. Falcons, frogs, felines, snakes, salamanders, spiders. Yup, come along for the adventure.
  7. Risking my life to make good videos. Whether I’m crawling through cactus and rattlesnake habitat or painting at the edge of a cliff I go the extra mile.
  8. Nature journaling where no one has before. I take you along for the adventure and test supplies in the weirdest conditions: up in trees, in ponds, on kayaks, whitewater rafts, and waterfalls.
  9. Overcoming discomfort to push the envelope. I don’t let swarming flies, mosquito attacks, wildfire smoke, or extreme weather stop me from making episodes every week.
  10. Innovative teaching techniques. I’m 100% committed to your learning even if it means I lose all the hairs on my arm or make a fool of myself.
  11. Hands-on teaching style. No chance of getting bored.
  12. Honesty. I share my personal struggles and keep it real.
  13. Dedication. I’m dedicated to crafting the best videos even if I have to burn a sketchbook.
  14. Good ideas. What other art teacher recommended you get a massage?
  15. Good stories. The nature journal takes you along for captivating stories.

 

Fish Illustration With Paul Vecsei on the Nature Journal Show

Paul Vecsei’s fish illustration is world class. His underwater fish photography is spellbinding, and his fisheries work is critical. So let’s dive into the world of fish, why they matter, and how to apply this to your nature journaling!

I first found out about Paul’s work on instagram @Fish_As_Art. The more I started looking into his work the more I knew I had to interview him. Eventually this conversation turned out to be one of the most fun I have had in a long time!

Fish Illustration Essentials

I asked Paul why does science illustration still matter in a world of photography. Since Paul does both I though he would have an objective answer. His response was short and to the point.

“Photos are plagued by their honesty.”

With drawing it is possible for the artist to focus on the characteristics that are most important. In contrast, a photograph blindly captures the way light is bouncing off a subject. For example, when Paul does a fish illustration he can be sure to depict the morphology that is essential for identifying that species. It is also possible to make sure all the fins are fully open which is important for identifying fish. It is also possible to do very clear comparisons between sexes for example.Fish Illustration, how to draw fish, why science illustration can be better than photography.

Why Fish Matter

Fish photography and fish illustrations by Paul Vecsei
Photo copyright by Paul Vecsei

Fish are one of the most widespread animals on earth. They exist throughout the oceans and there are fish on or around every continent. As such they make up an important part of the food chain and are very important source of protein for humans. Paul also points out that they are intrinsically worthy of study and respect due to their fascinating behaviors, adaptations, and beauty.

Fish Illustration Tips for Nature Journaling

  1. Pay attention to the context. Even if you can’t see the fish clearly or at all you can draw and record information about the aquatic ecosystem. Also look out for the presence or absence of fish hunting animals, fish remains on shore, and other signs of fish. Whether you see fish or not this information will add a lot to your pages and your learning.
  2. Bring the fish to you. Instead of hoping that you will see a fish from the shore or trying to nature journal the fish that someone catches you can take matters into your own hands. Try bringing a simple dip net and a cheap plastic portable terrarium. Now you can catch small fish  and keep them in water for a while to draw them. If you really want to be advanced you can get a photarium.Fish illustration toolsFish illustration tools
  3. Become aquatic yourself. If you want to take it even further you should get a snorkel. This is gonna be the next step for me. Paul spends a lot of time in the water with fish and he says it is very easy. Most of the action is in very shallow water. You can take photos easily with a GoPro, make your observations and then journal when you get dry. If you want some tips for nature journaling around water then check out this post.

If you want to see the amazing lightning round with Paul then you’ll have to watch the interview on my Youtube channel.

You can see more of Paul’s fish illustrations and fish photography at his Flickr site. And you can follow him on his Instagram where he also posts his fish drawings, fisheries research, and photos of tasty pastries!

fish illustration and fish science illustration by Paul Vecsei
Fish Illustration Copyright By Paul Vecsei

Pink Salmon Illustration by Paul Vecsei

How to Nature Journal on a Kayak

Learning how to nature journal on a kayak can take your enjoyment of nature to the next level. You are guaranteed to see new things because a kayak is an easy way to access hidden areas. Even a small lake in a crowded park will have niches that you can reach while everyone else is walking on the trails. You can have a more immersive nature experience all to yourself.

However, there are also some challenges about nature journaling from a kayak. These challenges prevent many people from even trying. I made this video to help you overcome those challenges.

Ten Tips for How to Nature Journal on a Kayak

  1. First of all choose a good location. You want a location that is close, convenient, calm, and comfortable. This will make it easier to nature journal.
  2. Practice kayaking and nature journaling separately first. It is exponentially harder to learn two new skills at the same time than to learn one. The more you can practice these skills separately the better you will do when you combine them.
  3. Keep your supplies simple. Don’t bring expensive stuff that you will get precious about. You don’t want to be fumbling with lots of stuff.
  4. Be safe. Follow all safety recommendations for the body of water where you kayak.
  5. Go with a friend. This is safer but also much more motivating.
  6. Plan for the sun. Be sure to wear a hat and sun protection.
  7. Deal with drift. It is hard to stay still while you are nature journaling from a kayak. Some options: use an anchor, do quick sketches only, wedge yourself in plants or mud, use a tandem kayak, or plan for the drift and set yourself up accordingly.
  8. Take care of your basic needs. Warmth, food, hydration, comfort are essential. If you don’t take care of these don’t expect great nature journaling.
  9. Use the kayak for access. In addition to nature journaling in the kayak you can use the kayak to access islands and other areas you normally couldn’t. Then just hop out and do some land-lubber nature journaling.
  10. Lastly, find the right balance between accessibility and protection of your supplies. Inside a ziplock at the bottom of a cinched-down dry bag strapped into the back of your kayak you might be a safe place for your journal but you will never take it out. It will stay dry and safe but it will also be unused. If you leave your journal in your lap while you paddle it might get wet.
Want to learn about watercolor and watch another nature journal adventure? Check out this post.
If you want to learn more about kayaking check out this article at REI.

Extreme Nature Journaling with Kim Mcnett

Extreme nature journaling has lessons for all of us even if we are just nature journaling from home. Do you want to find a deeper connection and purpose in your nature journaling? Do you want to nature journal more in the winter?

I was so excited to talk to Kim Mcnett for this interview.  Her pages on the nature journal club facebook page are great. But I knew I just  had to interview her for the Nature Journal Show when I saw the crazy expeditions she was nature journaling on!

Why Extreme Nature Journaling Matters to You

Despite my obvious interest in extreme nature journaling I think there are lessons here for everybody. Even if you are not nature journaling in the arctic, in the amazon, in the grand canyon or with hunter gatherer tribes in East Africa, there is still a lot to learn. First, we can all be inspired by the work that extreme nature journalers are doing. These people can also contribute to the global awareness about the environment and the role that nature journaling can play. Imagine if there were thousands of nature journalers on the frontlines: Documenting endangered species on every continent? Sketching and sharing about critical restoration projects around the world? Asking questions and painting landscapitos of shrinking glaciers in the arctic?

Lastly, and more practically, extreme nature journaling is a crucible for testing techniques and supplies in the most challenging situations. If a watercolor palette works in the high Andes or on a sea-kayaking trip it will probably work at your local park. Extreme nature journalers can then help the rest of our community grow and learn better.

10 Tips for Nature Journaling in the Winter

  1. Take care of your basic physical needs first. If you can’t stay comfortable and warm you will not be able to focus on higher level things such as nature journaling.
  2. Reset your expectations. You might not make your most beautiful art while you are working in challenging conditions. Rethink what your goal is. What else do you value besides a pretty page?
  3. Keep your supplies simple. Your winter kit should be basic. You don’t want to be fumbling with a lot of different materials.
  4. Practice being outside more. It is hard to practice two new things at once. You might need to just practice being comfortable outside more before you try to add nature journaling to your expectations.
  5. Try journaling from your window. You can nature journal the winter while staying in the comfort of your home if you sit at a window and look outside. This is a setup that is worth investing in. Maybe just moving some furniture around can make it work.
  6. Nature Journal from your car. Similarly, you can use your car as a mobile nature journal studio. Park it somewhere cool!
  7. Keep your hands warm with mittens. Kim recommends mittens over gloves.
  8. Keep warm with disposable chemical hand warmers. Have one of these in your pockets in case you start losing dexterity in your hands.
  9. Insulate your bum. Kim has cut a small piece of a sleeping pad to sit on. Or you can draw standing up.
  10. Cold weather watercolor tips: Although multiple people say you can use vodka instead of water to prevent freezing Kim has not had good luck with this. She also warns that gloves and mittens often smudge watercolor so be careful.

Why should I nature Journal in the Winter Anyways?

First of all, nature journaling is good for your mental health. Winter can be a dark time in more ways than one. Connecting with nature, unlocking our creativity, slowing down to pay attention, and getting some light exercise outdoors are all scientifically tested ways of improving your mood. Second, not nature journaling for five months out of the year is gonna put a huge dent in your learning and skill-building. You can also fall out of the habit, lose motivation, and miss out on nature journaling community or friendships. (nature journaling outside with friends is a fine way to connect during covid). Third, nature journaling in the winter will help you understand where you live so much better.

Nature Journaling can help save humanity

I often like to ask guests on the Nature Journal Show what  they think the future of nature journaling is. When I asked Kim she was adamant in her belief that we are in troubled times and that nature journaling could be one of the most important ways to help people shift their perspective. Living in Alaska for 10 years she has witnessed the accelerating climate change that is impacting the far north faster than the lower 48. She has watched permafrost disappear and glaciers recede. She argues that we have all the technology and know-how to fix this problem and prevent the destruction of our life support system. However, it is our willingness to change that is lacking. It is a shift in priorities and values that is needed and nature journaling can help people value nature in a deeper way.

More extreme nature journaling?

If you want to learn more about the nature journaling expeditions that Kim is doing and the other awesome work that she is up to check out her website.

If you want to a deeper look into some of the videos that Kim mentione and the work her partner Bjorn Olson is up to check out his website.

How to Use a Viewfinder for Drawing Landscapes

Did you know that you can improve a drawing 75% before you even start drawing? Knowing how to use a viewfinder for drawing landscapes is the first step. Whether you are a nature journaler or a plein air painter this video and blog post will help you.

Why Your Eyes Betray You

Your visual system is not setup for making great art. Your visual system is setup for keeping your butt alive. What does that even mean? Our eyes and the visual centers of our brain are good at paying attention to our surroundings. We are good at scanning large areas and paying attention to the big picture. However, there is a lot more information coming through your eyes than what you can fit on your paper or your canvas. This is especially dangerous for drawing landscapes. A lot of times we are attracted to the expansiveness in a landscape. If we aren’t careful we bite off too much. We try too big of a drawing. We get frustrated, we get lost in the details, and we lose touch with the basic artistic priorities.

Your most important job as an artist is to make intentional decisions about what visual information to include and what to ignore.

If you don’t know how to make good decisions or even worse if you don’t realize you have to make decisions then your drawing will suffer. Using a viewfinder helps you be more intentional and disciplined. Your field of view with both eyes is between 200 and 220 degrees! That is far more than you can fit on paper.

How to Use a Viewfinder for Drawing Landscapes

How to make a viewfinder
  1. Save the plastic container that salad mix comes in or get a sheet of cardstock or other heavy paper.
  2. Decide what shape you are going to make your viewfinder. Put some thought into how this shape will fit on your pages. For more about composition and layout of journal pages see this video.
  3. Trace your shape and carefully cut it with an X-acto knife or scissors.
  4. You can add grid lines to help you with proportions.
  5. Go out and use it right away!

Pro tip: Make multiple viewfinders of different shapes and sizes for your kit.

I really started using a viewfinder before my second trip to Tanzania and it really made my nature journal pages much better.How to Use a Viewfinder for Drawing Landscapes

Once you know how to use a viewfinder for drawing landscapes you will thank me!

How to Use a Viewfinder for Drawing Landscapes

If you want a step-by-step guide to landscape drawing in your nature journal check out this post.

How to Nature Journal Without Fear!

In this video I show you how to nature journal without fear, because I think it’s the most important thing for your nature journaling.

Why Nature Journaling Without Fear matters more than anything else

There are certain skills that automatically improve the more you nature journal. That is the good news. These aspects of nature journaling  are easy to teach, easy to learn, and easy to pick up from repetition. However, there are other things that you will not automatically get better at. In fact, these things could actually get worse as you become a more experienced nature journaler or advanced artist. I know many veteran nature journalers who struggle with these challenges.  What am I talking about? I’m talking about fear.

If you don’t have the best drawing skills it will affect your nature journaling somewhat. But if you are afraid of trying new things on your pages or are too intimidated to share your work it could hamper your nature journaling for life. Your drawing skills will probably get better just with more practice but your fears might not. It is easy to identify your drawing shortcomings, take a class, practice and get better. It is not easy to take a class to help you deal with your artistic fears and obstacles. You might not even be able to correctly diagnose the source of your mental obstacles or the fears that are holding you back.

Because of all these reasons I have decided that helping people be more fearless in their nature journaling approach is the most important thing I can share. If you want to learn how to nature journal without fear you might be interested in my one-on-one coaching.

Types of Fear in Nature Journaling

So, how does fear manifest itself in our practice of nature journaling? Following are some examples of fears related to perfectionism:

  • Fear of messing up, making mistakes, making bad drawings
  • Fear of nature journaling certain subjects: animals, movement, action, pets.

There are also major social fears. Such as:

  • Fear of feedback, judgement, or criticism.
  • Fear of nature journaling in public, sharing our work, or nature journaling with other people. Sometimes, this manifests itself as a fear to share our pages with certain people such as our family or spouse.

There are also the fears  from being too precious:

  • The fear of wasting materials, art supplies, or expensive paper.
  • Fear of ruining a pretty journal page or a fancy journal.
  • Fear of trying new techniques or new materials.

There are also fears of commitment:

  • Indecision around which subject to commit to, which vista to draw, which park to go to. We are afraid that we might miss something better. There might be a more beautiful subject, a more interesting plant just around the corner. This can be a paralyzing fear that might lead you to only take photos with your phone and never pull out your sketchbook.
  • Fear of permanence, fear of ink, over attachment to erasers and graphite or overuse of non-photo blue pencil.

Unfortunately, we live in a society that has primed us for these problems. For example, I know many adults who are simply afraid to draw. Maybe this fear is the result of an unfortunate childhood experience. Most of us have also been ingrained with the fixed mindset. This mindset assumes that we are born with certain immutable talents and limitations and can not learn new skills.

We often build up layers of rationalizations and habits of avoidance around these fears making them even harder to identify. Do we really prefer such a tidy style or are we just afraid to make mistakes on the page? Are botanical subjects really all we want to do or are we just afraid of drawing moving animals?

What Fearless Nature Journaling Looks like

So what does nature journaling without fear actually look like?

I have gotten glimpses of fearless nature journaling in Nature Journal Show interviews with Amaya Shreeve and Heather Crellin. What do these two have in common? Both are relatively new to nature journaling. Both seem to take real joy in the process. In addition, they both focus on quantity and frequency of nature journaling even if it is just a short session.

How Can You Nature Journal Without Fear?

If you want help nature journaling without fear I can help. Sign up for persoanlized coaching with me. We will look at your pages, I will listen to your joys and challenges and we will come up with a plan.

I’m currently offering one hour sessions on Tuesday and Thursdays afternoons and Sunday Mornings. Click on one of the available dates (in white) then choose a time slot.

  

Nature Journaling in the Grand Canyon! Post-Trip Share (Part 1)

I’m back from nature journaling in the Grand Canyon for 21 days. In my live “Show and Tell” video I share experiences and pages from the adventure!

You already know I have been testing nature journal supplies, clothing, sun protection, waterproof supplies, and other gear in preparation for this trip. You have heard about my training and my preparation. Now I’m back! And I have lots to share. In fact, it was so much I have to do a Part Two. My goal is to give you some answers to the following questions.

  • First, how did I prepare?
  • Next, how did I stay focused during the trip?
  • Lastly, what am I gonna do now that the trip is over?

Preparing to Nature Journal in the Grand Canyon

It can be hard to prepare for something that you have never done before. Had I ever been to the Grand Canyon before? Nope. Whitewater rafting with some of the biggest navigable rapids on the continent? Nope. Any whitewater rafting experience at all? No, but I went down a creek in an inner tube once. Any other river expedition experience? Nope. Had I ever spent 23 days camping with my girlfriend before? No…What about other multi-day expedition experience? Sort of… What about nature journaling in extreme conditions and unusual places? Yep, I got that one covered!

Nature Journaling the Grand Canyon
Photo by Brock Dolman

 

So first, I had to make sure I had the material needs covered to survive and thrive enough to enjoy the trip and have enough energy to nature journal. I didn’t want to break the bank on gear or spend forever trying to figure out what was best. Luckily, our trip leader, Cooper, and his partner Leah had a lot of the necessary gear that we could borrow. In addition, I managed to piece together a lot of the clothing necessary from my old wool hunting clothes and bought some used Patagonia layers. I love that they have a website dedicated to selling used gear that is still very useful and often like new.

Then, I focused my remaining funds on buying some key new pieces of equipment…
  1. A waterproof bag just for my nature journal kit. Watershed Largo Tote Bag(full review coming soon). Keeping my nature journal supplies easily accessible yet safe was a priority!
  2. Waterproof Notebook from Rite in the Rain. I also got two waterproof pens which ended up sucking…(review coming soon)
  3. Sun Protection was a priority for me! A wind resistant, non-floppy sun hat. Sun gloves so that I didn’t have to worry about sunscreen on my hands messing up my paper. I also got two sun shirts for sun protection on hot days.
  4. I also tried out an unusual style of sunglasses with no arms! Instead
    Photo by Brock Dolman

    of arms they have a cord attachment that makes them less likely to break and they don’t fall off even in the big rapids or while swimming, or under a 60 foot waterfall. Yes I tested them in all those settings. More review of these coming in the future.

  5. Last but definitely not least, I got an amazing camping chair. This chair was recommended by our trip leader for river trips. Luckily, I got it several months before the trip and it is one of my most useful nature journaling tools now! With this chair I was even able to sit in waterfalls and paint them.
    nature journaling in the grand canyon
    Sitting in a creek below a waterfall in my joeychair Photo by Brock Dolman
    Other Preparations for the Canyon

I knew from previous experiences that it would take me a while to get used to nature journaling in the Grand Canyon. Therefore, I tried to simulate aspects of the expedition in advance. I tested all the gear mentioned above. I tried to simulate conditions that I expected on the trip: wet, hot and sunny, cold and windy, etc. In addition to this type of training I also did research about the grand canyon and practiced layouts and techniques that I would use on my pages.

Balance and Commitment While Nature Journaling in the Canyon

Nature journaling is not always easy. Drawing moving subjects is not child’s play. Despite what people think, watercolor painting en plein air is not relaxing (especially when you only have 15 minutes, you are balanced on the edge of a sheer cliff full of cacti, the light is changing by the minute, spray from a waterfall is buffeting you, and a lifetime’s worth of potential paintings beckon to you from every direction you look in).  Choosing to nature journal while in a group of people doing other things requires balance, self-awareness, and social intelligence. Just choosing to sit with one vista or one plant when there are thousands of sights and experiences vying for your attention is a mentally taxing endeavor.

  1. Nature Journaling in the Grand Canyon
    Counting spines…Photo By Brock Dolman
Nature Journaling = Commitment

In these moments in the canyon it is easy for my mind to play tricks on me. It is easy to talk myself out of the work that I came to do. “It’s cold outside. Warm sleeping bag or sunrise landscape drawing? How can I nature journal before coffee? I should just take pictures of everything instead of trying to draw. I can draw from photos when I get back home. Maybe there is a better view around the corner. I probably need more time to capture this scene…no point in starting now. My nature journal supplies are too hard to get to. I’m too tired to try to draw this scorpion right now, besides look at all those legs! That is going to be too hard. I might mess up the look of the page if I try to sketch that scorpion. What if other people look at my drawing and its not that good?”

At such times it is good to shake all doubts from the head and invoke Steven Pressfield:

The most important thing about art is to work. Nothing else matters except sitting down every day and trying.

Seeking Balance

While busting one’s ass nature journaling is commendable being a human requires balance. Despite my own fantasies, this trip was not focused specifically on nature journaling in the grand Canyon. This was not like my Nature Journal Safaris in East Africa with John Muir Laws. Even though I planned on “working” on the trip and making a publication of my pages for my Patreon , the trip was actually supposed to be a vacation (why do I still struggle with that word?).

This trip also meant different things to different people. And despite my personal commitment there were plenty of other considerations on this trip. I was part of a team on a potentially dangerous expedition in an extremely remote area-I had a responsibility to the group and cooking and other duties just like everyone else. I was also part of a relationship – I was on this trip with my partner and had to tend to the needs of our relationship and spend quality time together.

grand canyon nature journal share
Sharing Nature Journal Pages with My Grand Canyon Friends photo by Brock Dolman
Me and Kate 🙂 Photo By Kate Freeman

Now What?

After spending 21 days without even seeing a building or a computer it has been a little hard adjusting to being back. However, I’m motivated to share my experiences with the community and I’m compiling and improving on my nature journal pages from the voyage to create a publication for you! This publication will be similar to my Tanzania Travel journal and will be available for print on demand via my author page on Blurb. It will probably cost around $30 for the hard copy and maybe $2 for the e-book. In addition my Patreon patrons of $5 and above will all get a copy mailed to them.

nature journaling in the grand canyon

nature journaling in the grand canyon