Nature Journal Class: Unlock Your Potential!

Do you think you can’t draw? Is your perfectionism a problem? Do you procrastinate when you really want to be nature journaling? If so, this nature journal class can help you. Over several years I have been developing and testing psychological strategies to help you achieve your nature journaling goals, learn faster, and feel better about your awesome self. Are you ready to unlock your potential?

Because I have been teaching nature journaling classes for five years I have seen how people learn and grow. In addition, I have seen the obstacles that people face that prevent them from reaching their goals. I have dealt with these challenges myself. That is why I developed this nature journal workshop. Of all the things that I teach these are the most valuable lessons that I can share with you.

Outline for “Nature Journal Class: Unlock Your Potential!”

  • Your mindset has a disproportionate impact on your achievement, enjoyment, and improvement in the nature sketching, art, and nature journaling.

Nature Journal Class Graph Showing Importance of Mindset

  • Unfortunately, there are many problems that can affect your mindset and we are not well-trained to notice or deal with these problems. Because these problems are internal it can be hard to recognize them in ourselves and we often develop stories that blame our problems on external factors.

Common Mindset Problems for Artists and Nature Journalers:

  1. Perfectionism
  2. Procrastination
  3. Negative Self-Talk
  4. Dependence on Praise
  5. Sensitivity to Feedback
  6. Lack of Focus
  7. Fear of Failure
  8. Artistic Ruts or “Writer’s Block”
  9. In addition to “Writer’s Block” is Fear of the Blank Canvas
  10. Lack of Time
  11. Other Responsibilities and Excuses
  12. Limiting Beliefs
  13. Comparison to “better artists”
  14. Lack of Self-Discipline
  15. And finally, Diva Syndrome
  16. Actually, there are a lot more…

Graphic of mindset problems for nature journal class

Because there are so many problems and because they are hard to see it is easier for us to externalize our challenges. By thinking things such as ” I will be able to nature journal better once I buy that new pencil” or “I need a more interesting subject to inspire me” we create limiting beliefs. As a result we have a limiting belief and our original problem which is now even harder to daylight.

So what can we do about this situation?!

In preparation for this nature journal class about mindset I spent months collecting a list of common mindset problems from artists and nature journalers. Then I tried to figure out solutions for all these problems. I have developed specific solutions for some of them such as my procrastination cocktail, but I think it is better to treat the root problems. Luckily, there are only a few root problems.

Root Problems for Artists and Nature Journalers

  1. Outcome Dependence:
  2. Lack Of Intentionality:
  3. Lack of Self Awareness:

Don’t worry. You can overcome all of these root problems and by working on them you can unlock your true potential. However, it’s not gonna be easy. But, the benefits will spill over into other aspects of your life. After much thought, I have summarized the ways to strengthen your nature journaling mindset through 5 major keys that I teach in this nature journal class.

The Five Mindset Keys covered in this Nature Journal Class

  1. Self Awareness
  2. Intentionality
  3. Feedback Loops
  4. Fuel
  5. Focus on Practice

If you want to learn some specific strategies to develop a stronger mindset be sure to watch the whole nature journal course on video. In the video I provide exercises to help you build self awareness and intentionality. In addition I give you a powerful tool to help fight negative self talk. Check out the full nature journal class here.

 

 

Landscape Painting From Photos: How-To

Are you stuck at home but you still want to make art and nature journal? Me too! That’s why I made this video on how to make a landscape painting from photos. Whether you are stuck at home because of the weather, because of a pandemic, or because it is dark outside this guide will help you. Learning how to use reference photos for watercolor painting is a good skill to build regardless.

The 11 Step Guide To Landscape Painting From Photos:

  1. First, you make a pot of tea. Actually, this is a very important step.
  2. Next, you create the station where you are going to be working. Since you are going to paint from photos of landscapes on your computer or iPad make sure you get the area organized. Get all your materials ready: watercolor, towel, brushes, pencils, nature journal,
  3. Third, choose your photo wisely. No matter your skills, your final drawing or painting is only as good as the photo it is based on. Certain things like sunsets are also extra hard to paint accurately so let us avoid those. Unfortunately, many beginners are attracted to sunsets. Hence the many amateur painting of sunsets online. We will get to sunsets once we build some basic skills.
  4. Fourth, crop and edit your photo for better painting. In the video I go into depth about how important cropping is. By cropping your photo intentionally you can make your painting more dramatic and you can incorporate important design elements such as the “rule of thirds.” Additionally, you can focus on the values better by turning your photos of landscapes into black and white.landscape painting from photos requires good photo references to paint from
  5. Next, we jump into the landscape painting process by drawing the basic shapes. Being able to simplify a landscape into 3-8 major shapes is essential. It is the arrangement of these basic shapes that gives the landscape painting it’s feeling and impact.
  6. After drawing the shapes it is time to lay in the lights and darks. You should aim for 3-8 gradations from light to dark. The sky is always the lightest. These gradations should match the simplified shapes from step 5.
  7. Now, it is time to go back and add another level of darkness to your landscape drawing. Pay attention to the dark spots in your photo reference and try to match these in your drawing.

Watercolor Painting Time!

  1. Now, it is time to really start painting from your photo. Turn the photo back into color then take out your watercolor and start laying in washes. First, do the paler washes such as the sky and the background. Focus on keeping the values correct.
  2. Add local color accents. Now, look at your photo reference and try to match some of the specific colors. But remember, these are accents so they do not need to go everywhere. And the most important thing is that your 3-8 major blocks are still recognizable separate.
  3. Now, add more contrast in the foreground elements and push your values a little more. Most of the time watercolor landscape paintings end up to pale.
  4. Finally, take a look at the reference photo for your watercolor painting and compare it to your actual page. Where could you do better? Try turning the photo back to black and white. How close are your values? For bonus points do another version of this landscape but with charcoal or graphite.
landscape painting from reference photo
One of these landscapitos was painted in the field and one was painted from photos

Painting from photos gives you a lot of tools to improve your landscape painting skills!

For more landscape painting ideas, especially for mini-landscapes check out this post

Don’t forget to watch the video for all the pro tips!

 

10 Nature Journal Ideas You Should Know!

Every hobby has special concepts and lingo and nature journaling is no exception. Have you ever encountered  nature journal ideas or language that you were unfamiliar with? If so, this video can help. I explain 10 nature journaling ideas and special words that every nature journaler should know.

And why should you know these words?

You should know these words because we need them to explain the specific ideas that are unique to our practice. In addition, they can be a shortcut to communicate a whole concept. For example, I can just say “pencil miles” to someone and convey a large amount of info succinctly. Otherwise, I would have to use several sentences to communicate the same idea.

Let’s get on with the words! Have you used any of the words below?

Ten Nature Journal Ideas You Need to Know:

  1. Pencil Miles: This is a cool phrase that summarizes the importance of repetition and practice for the improvement of drawing.
  2. Meta-Data: This heading at the beginning of our page gives info about the location, the time, and the date. In addition, you can add whatever data is relevant to you such as: the tide, who you are with, the humidity as well as symbols for the type of clouds or other weather features.
  3. Landscapitos:  These are small landscape drawings. For more about them check out this post on Landscapitos.
  4. Non-Photo Blue Pencil: Many nature journalers use these pencils for a faint under-drawing. They do not show up in photocopies or scans. Check out what John Muir Laws loves about them!nature journal ideas like this non photo blue pencil are important to understand
  5. The Pretty Picture Trap: This nature journal idea is one you want to avoid! Even though we all like beautiful drawings the fact of focusing on making pretty pictures can be a problem.
  6. Precious: Sometimes, when I have a drawing that is looking good, I start taking fewer risks because I start getting precious about it . This can hamper our learning. Similarly, this problem can emerge if you have really fancy materials or watercolor paper and you are hesitant to mess it up.
  7. Stealing Ideas: We use the word “stealing” in a positive way because we want people to be able to share ideas and learn from each other. Therefore, next time you are in a journal share “steal” some good ideas from someone instead of just admiring their pretty page.
  8. Post Hoc: Any nature journaling work that you do after the field trip is called post hoc which means “after” in Latin.
  9. Sacrificial Pancakes: One of my favorite nature journal ideas is the sacrificial pancake! These are the first drawings we make in a session while we are warming up because you have to make these before you can make good ones!
For number 10 go watch the video! You will also find a bonus one there.

North Bay Nature Journaling Paradise!

People who live in the North Bay are in luck! Because the San Francisco Bay Area is the epicenter of the Nature Journaling movement! If you live in Sonoma, Napa, Solano, or Marin you also know we have tons of beautiful parks and natural areas to explore. As a result, I consider the North Bay a Nature Journaling paradise!

Nature Journaling classes and clubs in our area:

  • As you probably know, I lead the Monthly Nature Journaling fieldtrips with the North Bay Nature Journal Club, usually in Sonoma and Marin. See the calendar here.
  • There is also the newly formed Napa Valley Nature Journal Club. Check out their Facebook page here. If you live and nature journal in the Napa Valley you can help this club grow.
  • Short Monthly Classes with John Muir Laws where he goes over specific techniques. See his calendar here. And he also leads a field trip near the end of every month sometimes in the north bay but also in the East and South Bay.

Here are my top three North Bay nature journaling spots for 2020!

  1. Abbot’s Lagoon in the Point Reyes National Seashore. This incredible location has it all: sand dunes, biodiversity, seabirds, otters, and beautiful vistas. It is a little bit of a drive if you are coming from Santa Rosa or Vallejo or Napa but it is definitely worth it for a half day or more nature journaling adventure.
  2. Sonoma Baylands Trail on San Pablo Bay. This central location is gonna be a relatively short drive from most towns. It is a wonderful place to marvel at the marshlands that used to surround the entire Bay Area. There are many seabirds and weird plants here too. Even though it is a short drive from the city you will feel peaceful here.
  3. Helen Putnam Regional Park. I have led the North Bay Nature Journal Club to this location several times. It is easy to get to but has beautiful oak savanna landscapes and wonderful old trees. It can get very hot so plan accordingly.
painting at helen putnam park one of my favorite north bay nature journaling locations
nature journaling at helen putnam photo by @amycycles

How to Paint Landscapitos!

Do you want a fun and creative way to connect with a place and create a memory? Painting small landscapes is the answer. In this video I have ten tips to help you paint better landscapitos.

  • Be intentional about framing your subject (what elements of the landscape do you actually want to include in your painting?)
  • Sketch the composition in a pale ink or pencil
  • Give yourself a short time limit!
Don’t forget to keep the painting small!
  • Simplify your landscapito so that there are only 3-4 different values (light and dark).
  • Use warm and saturated colors sparingly to draw attention to focal points.
  • Double check the values in your painting and make sure the sky is the lightest value in the landscape.
  • To give the illusion of depth the elements should become less dark, less saturated, and less detailed as they fade into the distance.
  • Don’t overdo “wet-on-wet” painting techniques.
Landscapito Paintings from the video
Two Ten Minute Paintings Made During the Video
If you use these tips and watch the video you will be on your way to making great landscapito paintings!

Nature De-Stress…

Have you ever had the feeling that time slowed down, your breathing became relaxed, and you felt a renewed connection to the world around you? I had this experience recently when I went nature journaling and painting at Helen Putnam Park with Amy Winzer recently. Even though I have been stressing about taxes and a million other things getting out into nature with a friend and paying deep attention to a tree while playing with watercolor had an instant effect. If you want a taste of relaxation during tax season come on my next nature journaling trip to the Grove of Old Trees on March 8th be sure to rsvp if you want to come, space is limited.

marley peiffer, marley pfiefer, marley pfeiffer,
photo by @amycycles

Check out more from this collaboration and more of the cool work that Amy is up to at her website.

How to Nature Journal When You Don’t Have Time!

Do you ever feel like you don’t have enough time ? Do you ever wish that you could carve out more time or be more disciplined about drawing or journaling more? But you don’t want to wake up at 3:30 in the morning? In this video I share some ideas that can help you.

 

 

How To Learn More From Your Old Journals

Do you need some nature journaling ideas, inspiration, and motivation? Did you know that you can learn a lot just by reviewing your old journals? In this episode of The Nature Journal Show I review one of my past journals and break down some tips for you to use.

I’m Trying Bullet Journaling!

Are you curious about fun analog ways to plan and organize your life? Join me in this experiment as I try out Bullet Journaling and see how I can incorporate it into my life and my other journaling systems.